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An etiquette expert from Florida has the right to choose when it comes to the eating habits of many Americans.

Jacqueline Whitmar of Palm Beach, Florida, told Fox News Digital this week that she even compiled a list of “12 coolest things people do at the dinner table” today.

The list is based on her observations over the years and time spent advising companies, organizations and individuals on a range of etiquette issues, including eating habits, workplace behavior and tipping practices on holidays.

She said she had seen rude behavior at one time – and that while many of her tips on turning bad habits into best practice may seem common sense, “politeness” towards others is not always as common today.

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“Etiquette is more than knowing how to use the right knife and fork,” Whitmar told Fox News Digital recently.

“I define it as ‘the art of knowing how to treat other people.’ In a nutshell, it’s about remembering how your behavior affects others. ”

Good eating habits make good sense – read the thoughts shared by the etiquette consultant from Florida.

She said people judge others by their behavior in the workplace, in society and in social situations.

The following, she said, are some of the “most sticky” table errors she has seen.

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If any of them seem painfully familiar – here’s the good news.

Solutions are also included. Let’s dive right in!

12 habits to give up

1. Talk with your mouth full

“Remember to swallow all the food before talking to others at the table,” Whitmar advised.

And if someone asks a question after you’ve taken a bite, “cover your mouth with your fingers to show that you’re still chewing,” she said.

If you just had a bite and your dining roommates ask you a question, "cover your mouth" office "shows that you are still chewing," said Whitmar.

If you’ve just had a bite and your dining roommates ask you a question, “cover your mouth” to “show that you’re still chewing,” Whitmar said.
(iStock)

2. Cut all the food at once

“If you cut off one bite at a time, you’re more likely to eat slower,” Whitmar said.

So, she added, “you can enjoy every bite”.

It’s also just the best manners around.

Cut off just one bite at a time, advised Florida etiquette consultant Jacqueline Whitmar.

Cut off just one bite at a time, advised Florida etiquette consultant Jacqueline Whitmar.
(iStock)

3. Eating before everyone is served

“Politely wait until everyone at the table is served before you start eating,” Whitmar said.

She said it applies, “no matter how hungry you are – or how worried you are that your food is getting cold.”

4. Monopolization of conversation

“The conversation is like a tennis match. It is better if two or more players are involved, ”Whitmar said.

This means, in a nutshell: “Listen more than you say and focus on others. Ask interesting questions, starting with” Tell me “, for example:” Tell me how you two met? “Or:” Tell me how you know the owner ? “

Instead of diving before everyone was served, Whitmar said it was much better "wait until everyone at the table is served before you start eating, no matter how hungry you are."

Instead of diving in before everyone is served, Whitmar said it is much better to “wait until everyone at the table is served before you start eating, no matter how hungry you are.”

5. Touching on controversial topics or jokes not by color

“Keep the conversation easy and interesting. Talk about topics that everyone can relate to,” Whitmar said.

“Controversial topics and jokes often insult, spoil the mood and make others uncomfortable,” she added.

“In many Asian countries, leaving a little on a plate also indicates that you are full and no longer hungry.”

6. Using bread, clean the plate

While it’s good to “eat everything on a plate,” Whitmar also said it’s “rude to use your bread to soak up any lingering sauce”.

She also said: “In many Asian countries, leaving a little on a plate also indicates that you are full and no longer hungry.”

Keep those elbows off the table (as most moms advise!) - and enjoy proper posture at the dinner table, urged one etiquette expert.

Keep those elbows off the table (as most moms advise!) – and enjoy proper posture at the dinner table, urged one etiquette expert.

7. Double dive

“Never eat from a shared dish and take a dip only once to avoid spreading germs,” Whitmar said.

8. Put your elbows on the table

In other words, my mother was right.

“Proper posture is important at the dinner table,” Whitmar said. “Sit up straight, avoid clapping your elbows when cutting food, and don’t lean on the table or lean your elbows on the table.”

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9. Conversation or text messages while eating

This is great. “If your cell phone is in sight, it indicates that you are expecting an important call,” Whitmar said.

It’s much better to “give to your friends who visit their undivided attention,” she said. “If you need to call or take a call, get away from the table.”

Instead of writing text messages during dinner and distracting your attention from others, "give your colleagues at dinner your undivided attention," said Whitmar.

Instead of sending text messages during lunch and distracting your attention from others, “give your colleagues who attend their undivided attention,” Whitmar said.
(iStock)

10. Drinking too much alcohol

It can “make you relax and forget your manners,” she said.

“You can say or do what you regret the next day. As the saying goes, “loose lips sink ships.” Be careful not to drink alcohol, especially if you need to go home. ”

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11. Eat too fast

“If you eat fast,” Whitmar advised, “learn to adjust your pace to suit others.”

“It makes other people feel uncomfortable when they’re still eating and you’ve walked miles ahead of them.”

Why is this important? “It makes other people feel uncomfortable when they’re still eating and you’ve walked miles ahead of them,” she said.

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12. Salt the food before tasting

“It’s often considered an insult to your host or chef if you salt food without having tried it first,” Whitmar said.

“Some recruiters even say it shows that you accept opinions without knowing the facts,” she added.

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