Saturday Night Live poked fun at the national drama surrounding the Georgia, Pennsylvania and Arizona caucuses on Saturday — citing political outsiders like Dr. Oz and NFL star Herschel Walker who have fared extremely well in the polls.

The show devoted its cold open to these political newcomers, going so far as to mock them in a mock interview that takes place in a parody of “PBS’s News Hour.”

Leading the charge, of course, was host Judy Woodruff, played by cast member Heidi Gardner, who welcomed satirical versions of Oz, Walker and Arizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake as part of the opening skit.

Woodruff Gardner begins the segment by introducing the three candidates, played by Mikey Day, Kenan Thompson, and Cecily Strong, respectively.

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Leading the charge, of course, was host Judy Woodruff, played by cast member Heidi Gardner, who welcomed satirical versions of Dr. Oz, NFL star Herschel Walker and Arizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake as part of an opening skit.

The news anchor then points out how the trio became GOP stars after starting their race as underdogs — though she doesn’t know how.

“Okay, all three of you have surged in the polls over the past few weeks, despite none of you having any political experience,” she begins, as the unlikely politicians stand on their own podiums in mock photos.

She then turns her attention to Walker Thompson, the former NFL running back and Republican candidate for the upcoming Senate race in Georgia.

‘Mr. Walker, you are now within three points of Senator Raphael Warnock. Why is your support growing?” – asks Woodruff, who was apparently stunned by the newbie politician’s current electoral success.

“And that’s where I don’t know,” Walker Thompson replies in the Heisman winner’s signature Southern drawl, no less surprised.

“The whole world is a mystery. Isn’t that right? For example, a thermos — it keeps hot, but it also keeps cold. My question is how to solve this? We are looking at it very carefully.”

When asked why millions in Georgia would vote for him despite two women claiming he footed the bill for their abortions, Thompson, as a former Heisman Walker winner, replied, “Gas.  Gas prices are really high

When asked why millions in Georgia would vote for him despite two women claiming he footed the bill for their abortions, Thompson, as a former Heisman Walker winner, replied, “Gas. Gas prices are really high

When asked why millions in Georgia are voting for him — despite two women saying he footed the bill for their abortions — the former Cowboys running back simply says, “Gas.” Gas prices are really high.”

Thompson added of Walker’s success: “As the great Donald Trump said, I can pay for an abortion in the middle of Fifth Avenue and not lose votes.”

He also said that the last time he checked, his son was a “boy.”

Meanwhile, playing Dr. Mehmet Oz, who left his long-running show last year to run for the US Senate from Pennsylvania, cast member Day donned a Phillies hat and awkwardly boasted to fellow contestants that he was eating a delicious “Philadelphia Cheese and Steak.” , and in the unpretentious capital of the state.

Seemingly trying to appeal to more of Philly’s blue-collar, grassroots voter base, but betrayed by the TV documentary’s characteristic stuffy cadence, Day, as Oz, explained that he was “lucky” thanks to the stroke of Democratic rival John Fetterman — before taking a moment to shill diet pills are guaranteed to help you lose 30 pounds a day.

Meanwhile, playing Dr. Mehmet Oz, who left his long-running show last year to run for U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, cast member Day donned a Phillies hat and awkwardly bragged to fellow contestants that he ate a delicious

Meanwhile, playing Dr. Mehmet Oz, who left his long-running show last year to run for U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, cast member Day donned a Phillies hat and awkwardly boasted to fellow contestants that he was eating a delicious “Philadelphia Cheese and Steak.” , being in the capital of the state

Ostensibly trying to appeal to more of the blue-collar, grassroots Philly voter base, but betrayed by the documentary's signature stuffy cadence, Day, as Oz's doc, took a moment to talk about diet pills guaranteed to help you lose 30 pounds in a day

Ostensibly trying to appeal to more of the blue-collar, grassroots Philly voter base, but betrayed by the documentary’s signature stuffy cadence, Day, as Oz’s doc, took a moment to talk about diet pills guaranteed to help you lose 30 pounds in a day

Meanwhile, Strongs Lake, a former Phoenix news anchor, thanked Woodruff for being on the program, which the Republican called “a cute little show full of lies.”

Under pressure to deny the results of the 2020 election and her support for former President Trump, Lake instead opines why she’s reaching out to voters — the show is clearly critical of the journalist’s efforts to validate her supposed “peoplehood” on members of her home state, despite praise is far from a convincing manner.

“I’m a regular Judy, I’m just a regular hometown girl who’s in soft focus all the time,” she tells Gardner’s Woodruff, noting that she’s tapped into “older scared” voters in Arizona, known for its large elderly population.

“Arizonas want to talk about issues that affect them, like crime in New York, or crime in Detroit, or the most pressing issue, the history of drag queens,” she continues, referring to the recent controversy surrounding the the emergence of public schools in Arizona and Florida sending their students to events hosted by drag queens.

“Men dressing up as loud sassy women introducing children to the joy of reading? Not on my watch, she said. “If the people of Arizona elect me, I will make sure they never have to vote again.”

Meanwhile, Strongs Lake, a former Phoenix news anchor, thanked Woodruff for her participation in the program, which the Republican called

Meanwhile, Strongs Lake, a former Phoenix news anchor, thanked Woodruff for being on the program, which the Republican called “a cute little show full of lies.”

The episode, which aired on October 29, was hosted by musician Jack Harlow, who was also the show’s musical guest.

The sketch comes as the state’s midterm elections loom on the horizon, with candidates set to speak out next week.

Many of the races, especially those held on a cold open Saturday, are particularly hot.

According to a recent poll, 51 percent of Pennsylvania voters support Fetterman, who suffered a stroke five months ago and then fumbled during last week’s debate, compared to 49 percent for Oz.

Senate elections in Georgia are also uncharacteristically tight. Incumbent Sen. Raphael Warnock has a significant lead among early voters, while challenger Walker is buoyed by potential support from voters on Election Day.

Warnock currently has a net positive rating of 51 percent favorable to 43 percent unfavorable among state voters, while Walker has nearly the opposite, with a net negative rating of 43 percent favorable to 52 percent unfavorable.

In Arizona, Katie Hobbs, who led Lake by a good 5 to 7 percent for most of the race, now trails Lake by single digits in several polls after refusing to discuss her opponent earlier this month.

The differences between all the aforementioned candidates fall within the 4.4 percent margin of error that is historically accepted when it comes to pre-election polls. Mid-term exams will begin on November 8.

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