Former Hillary Clinton campaign manager Robbie Mook told the court on Friday that it had signed with denounced allegations in connection with Donald Trump and Kremlin-backed Alfa Bank with the media ahead of the 2016 election.

Mook said at the trial of Michael Sasman, the first accused by Special Prosecutor John Durham in the investigation of his origin from Russia, that he was first informed about Alfa Bank by the company’s general lawyer Mark Elias.

He said he also discussed with then-senior adviser Jake Sullivan – now the White House National Security Adviser – and campaign chairman John Podesta whether to share information with the journalist.

“I also discussed it with Hillary,” Mook told the court.

He also acknowledged that the company was not “completely sure of the legitimacy of the data”, but hoped the reporter would track it down and determine if they were “accurate” or “substantial”.

“I don’t remember the gist of the conversation, but conditionally the discussion was: hey, we have this, and we want to share that with a reporter,” Mook said.

They decided to share this with the journalist after the meeting, he testified.

“I remember he was a member of our press service,” Mook said. “We allowed the employee to share this with the media.”

Former Hillary Clinton campaign manager Robbie Mook told the court on Friday that she had signed up to share the denounced allegations in connection with Donald Trump and Kremlin-backed Alfa-Bank with the media ahead of the 2016 election.

The court was also shown Hillary’s infamous message from October 31, 2016, which said: “Scientists have apparently discovered a hidden server that connected the Trump Organization with a Russian bank.”

The indictment was filed by John Durham, who was appointed special attorney during the Trump administration to investigate potential government wrongdoing in the early days of the investigation into Russian interference in the election and potential links to the Trump campaign.

The indictment was filed by John Durham, who was appointed special attorney during the Trump administration to investigate potential government wrongdoing in the early days of the investigation into Russian interference in the election and potential links to the Trump campaign.

The court was also shown Hillary’s infamous message from October 31, 2016, which said: “Scientists have apparently discovered a hidden server that connected the Trump Organization with a Russian bank.”

It included Sullivan’s statement entitled “Exposing Trump’s Secret Line with Russia.”

Sasman is accused of lying to the FBI that he represented Clinton’s campaign interests in 2016 and the interests of another client – although the company says it never sanctioned Sasman’s actions.

James Baker was the FBI’s attorney general in September 2016, when Sasman scheduled a meeting to provide him with computer data that, according to Sasman, showed a potential secret channel of communication between Alfa Bank and the Trump Organization.

Zusman is accused of lying to Baker during the meeting, saying he did not provide computer data on behalf of a particular client.

Prosecutors say Zusman did not disclose his ties to Clinton because he believed the FBI would find the information less reliable if it believed it was provided with guerrilla intent.

Susman’s indictment was filed by John Durham, a prosecutor appointed special attorney during the Trump administration to investigate potential government wrongdoing in the early days of investigating Russian interference in the election and potential links to the Trump campaign.

Lawyers deny that Zusman lied during the meeting, and suggested that prosecutors could not prove exactly what he said because only Baker and Zusman were present at the meeting and none of them made a record.

Sasman is accused of lying to the FBI that he represented Clinton's campaign interests in 2016 and another client's interests - although the company says it never sanctioned Sasman's actions.

Sasman is accused of lying to the FBI that he represented Clinton’s campaign interests in 2016 and another client’s interests – although the company says it never sanctioned Sasman’s actions.

The day before, Baker, a stellar prosecution witness, testified that he was confident the lawyer told him he did not act on behalf of a particular client when he provided information intended to suspect Trump.

Baker said he was “100 percent sure,” which Susman told him during a meeting on Sept. 19, 2016, at FBI headquarters that he was not there on behalf of any particular client.

FBI Attorney General James Baker (above) said he was “100 percent sure” that Sasman told him during a meeting on September 19, 2016 at FBI headquarters that he was not there on behalf of any particular client.

FBI Attorney General James Baker (above) said he was “100 percent sure” that Sasman told him during a meeting on September 19, 2016 at FBI headquarters that he was not there on behalf of any particular client.

“Michael is my friend and colleague, and I believed it and believed the statement to be true,” he said.

At the time of the report, the FBI was investigating whether the Kremlin and Trump’s campaign were coordinating to influence the outcome of the November presidential election.

Given the existence of this investigation, Baker said, he took the information seriously as a potential threat to national security and because Zusman told him that the media intended to report the data.

He quickly warned a senior FBI counterintelligence officer, thinking it could be another piece of evidence in the Trump-Russia investigation, and worried that cyber-data coverage could force Russia to change course.

“I already knew we had such an investigation underway, and here are another series of allegations concerning another aspect of the alleged interactions or ties between the Russian government and Trump’s campaign,” Baker said.

He later added: “It seemed very urgent and serious to me that I would like to inform my superiors about this information.”

Baker said Zusman believed the material testifying to the digital reverse channel was collected by serious and respected cybersecurity experts.

The FBI evaluated Baker’s findings and determined that there were no suspicious or secret contacts between Russia and Trump’s company.

“There was nothing there,” Baker said.

The trial, which began Monday, is the first significant public review of the conclusions of Durham and its prosecutors after months of increasingly harsh court statements from both sides.

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